We are conducting a prescribed hazard reduction burn on LASCELLES PDE in GOOSEBERRY HILL. We will be on site until 2200hrs

This is the very top of the Zig Zag.

We are conducting a prescribed hazard reduction burn on LASCELLES PDE in GOOSEBERRY HILL. We will be on site until 2200hrs

This is the very top of the Zig Zag.
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Quite a spectacle, you’re keeping our kids entertained. Thanks for keeping us safe👍

We are conducting a prescribed hazard reduction burn on MITCHELL RD in BICKLEY today. We will be on site for the rest of the day.

City of Gosnells Volunteer Bush Fire Brigade
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The area along Lewis road, between Moira Ave and Anderson road could use a burn off, was done a few months ago but it’s still extremely dry and leaves are a foot deep! Needs a good solid burn off!

Jim Vellinga, this is why the house smells smokey

We are conducting a prescribed hazard reduction burn on REEDS RD in CARMEL tonight. ... See MoreSee Less

We are conducting a prescribed hazard reduction burn on ASH RD in CARMEL today. We will be on site all day.

Multiple burns will continue to occur in this area as private land owners, Water Corporation, City of Kalamunda and Department of Fire and Emergency Services WA all work together to lower the fuel loads in the bush land surrounding Carmel.

Please note there is a general smoke alert advice for Perth souther suburbs to Bunbury, Perth hills to Harvey in the Perth metropolitan area and the South West. For more information: www.emergency.wa.gov.au/
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Keep up the great work, Kalamunda 🙌🏽

The Necessity of Controlled Burning, or “why is there so much smoke?”

We have had a number of comments on this page recently from members of the public complaining about smoke from burn-offs, so we thought we would explain why we burn and why putting up with smoke for a few days is a necessary evil that has a larger collateral benefit down the line.

The Australian bush has evolved over hundreds of thousands of years to be fire supporting. The majority of native Australian plant species need fire to regenerate and most have evolved mechanisms to survive fire. Likewise, most animal species have evolved strategies to survive low intensity fires. Lower intensity fire is actually good for the bush in that it helps it regenerate. It is almost like the bush wants to burn – bushfire fuel in the form of leaf litter, dead material and heavy tree bark accumulates over time making it more likely that a fire will keep burning and be harder to put out. It is basically inevitable that the Australian bush will burn eventually, maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, maybe not next year, but eventually. And if it burns with a heavy fuel load on a bad fire weather day, then it burns very very hot and very bad things happen, houses get lost, the environment gets badly damaged, and people potentially die.

So the principle of hazard reduction burning is based on this assumption that the bush will always burn eventually, and so we should burn it in a controlled fashion at a time when it is safe to do so. In this way we can achieve a number of beneficial targets – controlling fuel loads and keeping them within safe levels, regenerating the bush through appropriately applied fire regimes, protecting the community from potentially bad fires, and helping keep firefighters safe when a fire does inevitably happen. If we burn the bush on an eight to ten year cycle we can achieve all these things. Unfortunately there is only a small window each year, in spring and autumn, where we can burn safely and effectively. With climate change that window is getting even smaller, due to a longer fire season. Burning in summer is too dangerous, while burning in winter is ineffective as it doesn’t get rid of enough of the fuel. So we have to make the most of these conditions during the few months each year that we get them.

It is also worth noting that the smoke produced by low intensity hazard reduction burning is a fraction of that produced by a high intensity wildfire. A big high intensity wildfire produces about 1000 times the amount of smoke that a low intensity burn does. So the bigger picture is that hazard reduction burning actually limits the amount of smoke that the community has to put up with. It just means that it happens at this time of the year, rather than in summer.

The Necessity of Controlled Burning, or “why is there so much smoke?”

We have had a number of comments on this page recently from members of the public complaining about smoke from burn-offs, so we thought we would explain why we burn and why putting up with smoke for a few days is a necessary evil that has a larger collateral benefit down the line.

The Australian bush has evolved over hundreds of thousands of years to be fire supporting. The majority of native Australian plant species need fire to regenerate and most have evolved mechanisms to survive fire. Likewise, most animal species have evolved strategies to survive low intensity fires. Lower intensity fire is actually good for the bush in that it helps it regenerate. It is almost like the bush wants to burn – bushfire fuel in the form of leaf litter, dead material and heavy tree bark accumulates over time making it more likely that a fire will keep burning and be harder to put out. It is basically inevitable that the Australian bush will burn eventually, maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, maybe not next year, but eventually. And if it burns with a heavy fuel load on a bad fire weather day, then it burns very very hot and very bad things happen, houses get lost, the environment gets badly damaged, and people potentially die.

So the principle of hazard reduction burning is based on this assumption that the bush will always burn eventually, and so we should burn it in a controlled fashion at a time when it is safe to do so. In this way we can achieve a number of beneficial targets – controlling fuel loads and keeping them within safe levels, regenerating the bush through appropriately applied fire regimes, protecting the community from potentially bad fires, and helping keep firefighters safe when a fire does inevitably happen. If we burn the bush on an eight to ten year cycle we can achieve all these things. Unfortunately there is only a small window each year, in spring and autumn, where we can burn safely and effectively. With climate change that window is getting even smaller, due to a longer fire season. Burning in summer is too dangerous, while burning in winter is ineffective as it doesn’t get rid of enough of the fuel. So we have to make the most of these conditions during the few months each year that we get them.

It is also worth noting that the smoke produced by low intensity hazard reduction burning is a fraction of that produced by a high intensity wildfire. A big high intensity wildfire produces about 1000 times the amount of smoke that a low intensity burn does. So the bigger picture is that hazard reduction burning actually limits the amount of smoke that the community has to put up with. It just means that it happens at this time of the year, rather than in summer.
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And I just thought it was so the firies could get some overtime money as there wasn’t a lot of fires this summer season. (Thank goodness). In all seriousness though there must be about 5 months of the year that this can happen, why so many so close together? I feel very sorry for people with respiratory illnesses, and don’t say stay home and close your windows, kids have to go to school, people have to work.

I have to bite my tongue when people whinge about the prescribed burns. It's so save lives and homes stupid people!

Around 12 ago the back burning wasn't being done around the kalamunda hills .... We then had Pickering brook and karragullen fires devastating the region Tireless effort of volunteers and fire fighters with back burning helped reduce the spread Yes we have smoke but I would rather that (and yes I am an asthmatic as well) Than having to experience fires like Pickering again

Smoke doesnt do my asthma any good but I sure as hell would rather rely on my Ventolin for a few days that to risk the devastation of an out of control bush fire and rely on the luck of the gods for the safety of my girls and all the other volunteer firies trying to control those fires!! Good job to all 👏💗

Keep up the good work and not worry to much about the negative points on smoke haze

You wouldn't complain if you had been trapped on your property with a bushfire bearing down on you.

Keep up the good work crew and if there is a wildfire the smoke is always worse. Just ask the Californians and Victorians what happens when you don't get enough controlled burns done due to Enviromental concerns and a wildfire starts........environmental devastation is the answer.

Controlled Burns are a necessity. If they didnt take place. Firefighters would be non existent.

People do complain but we need to bear in mind it is for thr greater good we don't want the destruction that happens in places that don't controll burn

I can’t believe people are complaining.

The indigenous people did it long before the white man.

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We are conducting a prescribed hazard reduction burn on BENBULLEN RD near VALLEY RD in KALAMUNDA tonight. We understand the smoke is terrible already tonight, but these burns go along way to help protect homes in our community.

We are conducting a prescribed hazard reduction burn on BENBULLEN RD near VALLEY RD in KALAMUNDA tonight. We understand the smoke is terrible already tonight, but these burns go along way to help protect homes in our community. ... See MoreSee Less

 

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I understand it is necessary, but as someone living with a chronic lung condition could you not have postponed it untill all the other smoke had cleared away?

Shared on EASE WA xxx

The burn offs are necessary in the reduction of fuel loads and preparation for summer.

It's a necessary evil - good work guys!

Jennie Potter

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